My own personal connection and emotional
attachment to this neglected craftsmanship is
indicated in this dedication:

First and foremost I want to thank those
wonderful artists that designed all these examples
done so many decades ago. The artists who actually
created the engravings are gone, those who drew the designs
are gone, those who made the watches are all but gone.

Through books and catalogs like Roy Ehrhardts Foreign and American Pocket Watch Identification and Price Guidebook #3 and the NAWCC, I hope to resurrect those wonderful works of art. Their art is so easily overlooked and long forgotten. This by way of color and the computer, is my contribution to the Art World.

What began with award-winning work in woodcarving, teaching, and solo shows transitioned when my designs reminded a friend of his late grandfatherâs catalogue of watches from the year 1902. From that chance association came the inspiration from "Timepieces". I was already working in computer graphics (where I designed everything from corporate logos to a commemorative memorial installation) but I experimented for a long time before I showed my new work to anyone.

What I developed was a complicated and secret process. All I will reveal about it is that I begin with engravings of traditional watchcases (initially sculpted by unknown European craftsmen around the turn-of-the-century), deconstruct them by breaking-down, selecting, "cleaning-up" and reassembling various elements in many sequential layers utilizing several custom-configured computer programs. Then painstakingly begins the coloring the cases were only done in gold, silver or other metals, they were sometimes jeweled or enameled but otherwise featured color. Like a craftsmen of old, working on an illuminated manuscript, I spend countless hours coloring, blending, shading and texturing the work before outputting the final result as a fine art print. I am currently at work on "It's About Time," a fine art book featuring my pieces and celebrating the work of the forgotten, neglected masters who inspired me.

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